ANTIGUA

The Spirt of Adventure – Antigua

Gallery

If you love the great outdoors, then welcome to Antigua. This island’s adventures can hang with the best of them (and that includes literally hanging off the side of cliffs). You can rock climb, scale rugged mountainsides on 4-wheelers, take extreme tours on fast boats or even create an unforgettable memory during a hunting or fishing excursion.

Why Go to Antigua
Historic sites, tasty cuisine and a lively cultural scene can all be found on Antigua. But most often it’s the beauty and versatility of the island’s 365 beaches that draw travelers from afar. Do you like to party in the sand? Are you looking for safe, shallow waters where your kids can play? Would you be interested in exploring the ocean deep? Antigua’s got you covered with one beach for every day of the year.

Save your breaks from the sand and sun for the go-to sites of Antigua; its sleepy sister island, Barbuda, has a more relaxed, less touristy feel. If you do venture to Antigua’s attractions, you’ll find that the panoramic view from Shirley Heights or the fascinating history of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine are largely overlooked by the sun worshippers who have set up camp along the shores. That will just make your sightseeing trips all the more pleasant — you’ll have fewer people to wrestle with as you uncover some of this island’s hidden charm.

A Beach for Every Day of the Year
Antigua has some of the bluest waters and most refreshing beaches on the planet. Some of these popular spots are Darkwood Beach, Doigs Beach, Rendezvous Bay and Pigeon Point. So all you have to worry about is enjoying the scuba diving, snorkeling, deep-sea fishing, sailing, jet skiing or kayaking just off the island’s 365 beaches. That’s a beach for every day of the year.

Historical Cities
History is a major part of the culture of Antigua. In fact, there’s an entire district dedicated to just that at Nelson’s Dockyard National Park. Then, you can stop by St. John’s Cathedral in the capital city of St. John’s, see the artistic side of history at the Sea View Farm Village, purchase authentic Antiguan folk pottery or see the Harmony Hall Art Gallery. With hundreds of years of history all over the island, there’s always plenty to see.

One of the nicest things about Antigua is its zero tolerance of high culture. One year someone brought in the RSC to do Hamlet and all the great and the good turned up and snored through it. And if you’re a resolute reader of prestigious literature, do bring a book else you’ll be reading the Antiguan Mills & Boon, Island Matters (‘Marlene could not believe it was his deep voice murmuring sweet things and trying to open the door…’), or the local paper, which is known as ‘the one-minute silence’. And then back to talking again, the island tugging you down deep into what can feel like an irresistible hotbed of pirates and scoundrels, stories of businessmen who’ve pitched up and behaved with slippery villainy, cricket matches that triumphed and those that didn’t because the grass in the new stadium came up in dehydrated tufts in the first over, and all the usual gossip about husbands and wives doing the dirty under the eternal Caribbean sun.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,