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The heart of Asia – Once you go , you know

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A modern Asian megalopolis steps into the spotlight as World Design Capital.

Less expensive than Hong Kong and Tokyo, Taipei is garnering some much-deserved attention as the World Design Capital for 2016. Events are scheduled throughout the year, but design hounds should time their visit to coincide with the WDC International Design House Exhibition (October 13–30), when the city will be turned into a huge exhibition ground. The thriving capital of Taiwan is a buzzing, highly cosmopolitan city where giant modern skyscrapers—like the distinctively bamboo-shaped, 1,670-feet-tall Taipei 101, the world’s tallest building until 2010—tower over ancient temples, peaceful parks are juxtaposed with clamoring and chaotic markets, and cutting-edge hotels and nightlife spots pack in the glitz and glamour. Don’t forget about the food: Come for the seemingly endless variety of options at popular Shilin or one of the several other night markets, the perfectly executed handmade dumplings at world-renowned Din Tai Fung, and themed restaurants like Central Park Café, a Friends-themed restaurant (No.3, Lane 240, Section 3, Roosevelt Road), and Hello Kitty Kitchen and Dining (No. 90, Section 1, Da’an Road).

Where to Stay: For futuristic, luxurious, and sexy style, head to the W Taipei. Another option is the stylishly modern midrange Dandy hotel chain, which has several locations around central Taipei, including one in the quiet part of the Tianjin neighborhood, near the National Palace Museum and one that overlooks lovely Daan Forest Park, Taipei’s equivalent of New York’s Central Park.

Insider Tip: The concept of the cat café originated in Taipei in 1998 and there are a number of popular spots where visitors can hang out with the cats—and sometimes dogs—while drinking coffee or tea. Some also serve food and alcohol.

When to Go: The best time to go is November to April, when temperatures average in the 70s. Avoid June to August if you can, when temperatures hover around 100 degrees with high humidity. Avoid Chinese New Year, though, in January or February, when Taiwan essentially shuts down.

Source : http://www.fodors.com
Photo Credit : http://cdn.pcwallart.com

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